Who Drinks the Most Coffee… And The Most Tea?

Coffee. What would be be without it, I ask you? Comatose heaps of dislodged neurons.
And without a civilised cup of tea? Cavemen pulling each other’s entrails out with chewed up sticks.

So, I went to find out just how hooked we are on our favourite hot beverages by consulting the commercial database once more, and, as it turns out, we imbibed close to 970 billion cups of coffee, and… wait for it… almost 1.5 trillion cups of tea, globally in 2012.

It’s official: Scandinavians are coffee addicts
I wouldn’t have guessed it, but it’s Norway leading the coffee drinking world, with 2,196 cups gulped per capita in 2012, followed by the Netherlands (1,679 cups), Finland (1,208 cups) and Sweden (1,158 cups). Germany is in fifth place with 1,032 cups.

Italians, despite having the reputation of taking their coffee adoration very seriously, only managed 584, and the US came in at 348 cups. UK mustered just 230, which shouldn’t really surprise anyone, known as they are for being the world’s most avid tea guzzlers. We shall find out shortly whether they live up to their reputation…

The above refers to total coffee (fresh & instant combined), but who drank the most instant? It’s New Zealand, with 353 cups a year in 2012 (and just 146 cups of fresh coffee!).

A lovely cuppa :) Pic taken by a British friend, of course!

A lovely cuppa 🙂 Pic taken by a British friend, of course!

So, who is the world’s number one tea drinking nation…?
OK, here’s the bit you’ve been waiting for. Do the Brits really drink the most tea?? Nope. Not by a long shot. It’s Turkish consumers who are the most partial to a cuppa, slurping 1,688 cups per head in 2012. Next on the list are Iran, Morocco and Uzbekistan, all managing over a thousand cups per annum.

UK intake is a comparatively paltry 619 cups. Utterly scandalous, this. I feel deceived. The Russians are ahead of them, and so are the good people of Ireland, New Zealand and Pakistan.

US consumers, if anyone’s wondering, are clearly not big fans of tea, managing just 160 cups.

 

[For data source, click here]

22 thoughts on “Who Drinks the Most Coffee… And The Most Tea?

      1. ladyofthecakes Post author

        The stats come from a commercial database I use for my work. People like Nestle, Kraft, Unilever, Coca-Cola, Pepsi etc. also use this database (and others like it) to make their strategy decisions.

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      2. ladyofthecakes Post author

        And seeing as these stats are per capita, i.e. for every man, woman, child, many Norwegian adults must exceed those 6 cups per day, as we can assume that children under 10 may not yet be drinking any coffee…

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  1. Bastet

    I’m not surprised about how the Italians fared with coffee! They love the brew and make a cult out of it…really…but are very wary about the effects of coffee on their other adoration…a full nights rest…after 5:00 many Italians won’t touch the stuff! I must be Swedish. 😉

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      1. Bastet

        Yes, true I enjoyed it very much whilst in Barcelona…but we also looked an an Espresso every once and awhile…You sound very Italian talking about coffee! 😉

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    1. Anna

      Ooops. This was meant for a different post 😛

      And to this I say: I usually have a cup of coffee (lots of cream and Splenda) in the morning and a cup of tea (3 in the winter) in the afternoon. My dad drinks 8 cups of black tea per day. And my whole family ‘imports’ pounds of flavored coffee beans from the US on every trip – in Moscow they are 3-4 times more expensive!

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  2. Pingback: Coffee-to-Go-Go | What I Don't Know

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