Lisbon Is All About… (Part I)

…smokey streets:

ChestnutsThe smoke emanates from these little stalls selling deliciously succulent roast chestnuts. They are a common sight all over Europe at this time of the year, of course, but I’d never seen them being roasted in metal buckets before, from which the glistening brown morsels emerge all white, dusted with a fine covering of ash. Maybe this bucket-roasting technique is the reason why they are not in the least bit dry and so easy to peel.

…pygmy fire hydrants

Fire HydrantThere are legions of these foot-high midgets, perched on their little pedestals, strategically positioned all around town.

…cute little kiosks

KioskThe kiosks are just as ubiquitous as the fire hydrants, and fulfill a related purpose ๐Ÿ˜‰ I took this pic on Christmas Day, which is why this little pink refill-station is closed.

…citrus trees in the streets

Citrus

...and, you’ll have been waiting for this… THE FAMOUS TRAM!

TramThere will be more Lisbon Tram pictures, once I’ve had the chance to go through them all.

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28 thoughts on “Lisbon Is All About… (Part I)

    1. ladyofthecakes Post author

      I’m back home now, where there’s even more sunshine ๐Ÿ™‚ Having grown up in latitudes where they don’t grow, I’ll never ever get sick of the sight of fruit-laden citrus trees.

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  1. tobyo

    ah….I remember chestnuts being roasted on the streets of Madrid. you’d get a little paper bag full but I don’t recall what they roasted them in. I do remember the trams of Lisbon too. what fun!!

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    1. ladyofthecakes Post author

      They just roast them on a grill, with coals underneath. Produces much less smoke, but, so it seems, a less tasty result as well! I shall keep buying them, though, what an excellent and healthy snack.

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      1. suej

        Aaah, must have been thinking of something else! I love roast chestnuts, we used todo them in the oven or on the fire at home… ๐Ÿ™‚

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  2. pollyheath

    God, I think my next destination needs to be somewhere with easy access to sun and fresh citrus! Can’t wait to see more tram pics, it’s so dreamy!

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  3. Anna

    I never got tired of seeing citrus trees all over Spain and Portugal. To a Northerner’s eye it’s like a magical set piece. But chestnuts – eek. Not a fan. Don’t get the appeal.

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  4. Kim G

    Wonderful pics! I especially like the first one, and am intrigued by the building in the background.

    I have to get to Portugal some day. Portuguese is SO sexy-sounding.

    Saludos,

    Kim G
    Redding, CA
    Where the English is flat, and unaccented. At least to this California native.

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    1. ladyofthecakes Post author

      That is Rossio train station in the background, and I’ve a better pic of it, which I shall post in due course. A beautiful building.
      Yes, go visit Portugal. The people are lovely and very polite, and if you speak Spanish (I think you do?), then you won’t have any communication problems in Lisbon. Everyone seems to speak Spanish here (and English as well), and you’ll be able to understand 99% of all written material.

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      1. Kim G

        I do speak Spanish, though I’ve heard it’s easier for the Portuguese speakers to understand Spanish than vice-versa. And I can definitely read Portuguese. One of these days I should try to learn to speak it. After Spanish, I can’t imagine that it would be that hard.

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      2. ladyofthecakes Post author

        Yes, it’s def easier for them to understand you than it will be for you to understand them (if they speak Portuguese), but, like I said, most of the people we spoke to in Lisbon responded to us in Spanish.

        As an aside, Portuguese Portuguese is a lot harder to understand than Brazilian Portuguese.

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  5. Heyjude

    Used to buy roast chestnuts like that from a stand outside the bus station in Wakefield, Yorkshire when I was a teenager coming home from the disco – covered in ash, but easy to peel and oh so sweet and tender! And the smell! I need to write a post about Lisbon, I have so many photos of the place too. As for the language, it looks similar to Spanish, but sounds Eastern European! Only word I could manage was obrigado!

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    1. ladyofthecakes Post author

      Really??? I’ve never seen that before. Plenty of roast chestnut vendors where I’m from, and also here in central Spain, but they don’t do it the ‘white ash’ way, which is superior, CLEARLY.

      You only say “obrigado” if you’re a man. It’s “obrigada” for women ๐Ÿ˜‰ My Portuguese teacher tortures me every Monday afternoon. Only too happy to pass on the wisdom, ha ha.

      Looking forward to more Lisbon photos!

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