There’s Sculptures In My Woods!

Today’s plan already seemed like the perfect plan: A cake outing, preceded by a walk through the woods around a local lake. But little did we know that there had been an invasion of the weird and wonderful:

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What the…? This is when we twigged that something wasn’t quite right…

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Nature sure is amazing, but we’d never seen any of THAT colour before

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Flying tropical fish?

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A giant clothes peg, anyone?

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The Delta-7 Jedi Starfighter prototype

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Wolves or wild boar?

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Not a sculpture, but pretty 🙂

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Awww, someone was worried about her…

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And a delicious Apfelstrudel for me at the end 🙂

 

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76 thoughts on “There’s Sculptures In My Woods!

  1. joannesisco

    What a wonderful find! I love your photos … all of them, but I’m always partial to gorgeous water scenes. I think there should be more art installations in nature.
    … and cake. There should be more cake, too 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  2. heatherinde

    Germany is so random sometimes, I love it! Especially the blue wave-looking thing. Very appropriate next to the water. And of course, the strudel looks amazing. Kinda regretting not stocking up on sweets for my week of not leaving the house right about now…

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    1. ladyofthecakes Post author

      That thing was indeed entitled “Die Welle” 😉

      NOW is the time to stock up on sweets, with all the Christmas stock reduced to clear! Bought a huge plastic bag full on Monday. The skinny bitch an der Kasse smirked at me 😉

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
      1. heatherinde

        Haha, maybe that’s my art degree being useful? Or just a lucky guess? Good point on stocking up, but my goal for the week was to not have to wear pants and I am trying reeeeally hard to stick to it. BV has to go back to work tomorrow so my evil plan is to get him to stop at the store on the way home…

        Liked by 1 person

    1. ladyofthecakes Post author

      Hmmm. Good question. A strudel is not really considered a “cake”, but one could argue that it ought to be classified as such. Some people don’t even consider it a dessert, because it was traditionally served as a main course.

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  3. Kim G

    I think you need to have a stern word with those artist-types about the positively shocking lack of any cake-sculptures in the woods. Heck, it doesn’t even seem that cake was even ironically referenced even once.

    What has the world come to?!?!

    Saludos,

    Kim G
    Boston, MA
    Where we have been continually debating whether we should make cherry pie before leaving for Mexico, where such things are simply unobtainable.

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    1. ladyofthecakes Post author

      But, Kim, remember, these are GERMAN woods. There are cafés harbouring cakes spaced 10-walking minutes apart 🙂

      Cherry pie! There had better be a blog post about that. Just sayin’.

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      1. Kim G

        My new housemate is vegan and can’t eat pie due to the butter in the crust. I didn’t have that problem with the last housemate. Perhaps I should force-feed him?

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  4. Jackie Cangro

    Completely off topic…
    I read this essay in The New Yorker and thought you might enjoy it. It’s written by Jhumpa Lahiri (one of my favorite fiction writers) about her desire to learn Italian. She eventually moves to Rome in order to immerse herself in the language. The essay is a bit long, but a lovely take on how language connects us to our essential selves. It reminded me of your French and Portuguese lessons. How is that going, by the way? 🙂

    http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/12/07/teach-yourself-italian

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    1. ladyofthecakes Post author

      Thanks for this! I love off-topic 😉 I’ve just read Flirting with French by William Alexander – I’m sure you’d enjoy it, too, it’s very well written and hilarious, in parts.

      My Portuguese is going OK, I feel a strong bond with it, I can read books and have a conversation. Sort of, with lots of mistakes, but hey. With French, I struggle. I don’t feel any emotional connection to the language just yet. (Actually, I do, but it’s not very positive, I must confess) It’s an aseptic task, almost, learning the grammar and the vocab. Unless this changes, I won’t last the distance, I realise…but it’s still very early on for me, I’m not inclined to give up just yet – far from it.

      What about you and your Italian?

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      1. Jackie Cangro

        Oh, my Italian is at a stand-still. I took all 20 advanced lessons through Living Language and then came to the terrible conclusion that I couldn’t remember a thing I’d learned. Problem is, I still think in English. Reading your and Linda’s posts (and The New Yorker essay), I understand now how important it is to have a conversation partner. That would help me to start thinking in Italian first. But I have to get over my embarrassment, and I have to find a very patient partner!

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      2. ladyofthecakes Post author

        You can’t get over your embarrassment first, you get over it WHILE you’re engaged in the process. Just like dancing… if you’re sitting on the sofa, waiting to get better before stepping onto the dance floor… you see the flaw in that “strategy”, don’t you…?

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      3. Jackie Cangro

        That’s a great analogy! You’re absolutely right. I have a bad memory of going to an Italian meet-up group where everyone was nearly fluent. I couldn’t keep up as the conversation flew around me. I just smiled and nodded like I knew what they were saying until the moment I could slink out of there. I just need to find a group of conversation partners where the people are willing to be a bit more patient (and hopefully bring cake).

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      4. ladyofthecakes Post author

        Conversation groups where everyone is better than you are torture – this is why I’m still stalling on joining the local French one. Am taking private lessons to get to the level where I can participate. 1-2-1 is best, I find, to get over the initial hurdle. Especially if you’re a reluctant speaker (like me).

        Liked by 1 person

  5. TheLastWord

    I love that Frame of Reference sculpture and the picture of the two trees against the blue sky. Brilliant conception….

    Amazing that my two best commenters / readers both excel at photography…. there’s gotta be a link somewhere….

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  6. Clare Flourish

    I walked round my local park today. Looking down the hill to the lakes, I could see one glittering in the sunshine from more than half a mile away.

    However. I popped over because you had a question you were unlikely to get an answer I’d like where you asked it. There are late transitioning trans women. I did it aged 35, which is quite different from transitioning in late teens. Many of us, especially the “gynephiles”- see what I did there? It’s a lot less controversial than “lesbian”- try to make men of ourselves. We work very hard on it. Then we can do it no longer. We transition, and lose our tense defensiveness and insane levels of stress. Common responses are around how we are much easier to be with, or how it is as if we were acting when presenting male, just being ourselves when expressing female.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
      1. Clare Flourish

        I found it wearing. The person alleging “transactivists support rape” really has it in for my lot, and I wonder why. “The Arbourist” is prone to humourless walls of text. The derisive terms get wearing: I admit I am ridiculous, but do not really like it being pointed out to me so vociferously. I liked your comments there, questioning rather than challenging.

        Onywye. It meant I came here. I like your photos, especially the horizontal thing suspended by two ropes, and the blue thing which I saw as a magical pathway. Hello. Nice to meet you.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. ladyofthecakes Post author

        I have to admit, I floundered during The Arbourist’s post and …gave up. In about the third line, I think 😉

        Well, since I have no “authority” on these topics, being merely an outside observer, all I can do is ask questions and wonder how I’d feel if it were me (as if that came anywhere close to actually living the experience…erm…I think not…) and how I would like to be treated.

        Thanks for kind words about photos. I enjoy taking them with my crappy little camera, very therapeutic.

        Like

      3. Clare Flourish

        We all have the same choice, you as well as me: conform or diverge. The more people get to diverge, the more freedom there is. I may be just boringly wrong to use a female name, but eccentrics should gain courage from my example, and I think that’s a good thing. And wondering how it feels to be someone else is the heart of being human, the delight and challenge of it.

        Liked by 1 person

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