Tag Archives: Beautiful Buildings

Schloss Nymphenburg

Nymphenburg Palace was the summer residence of Bavaria’s rulers, the Wittelsbacher family. The gardens, which are largely woodlands, are enormous and contain, in fact, five palaces, one big one and four teensy ones. Well worth a visit if you happen to be in Munich with an afternoon to spare and a hankering for a dose of nature.

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I had a delicious plum crumble, but wolfed it down too fast to take a photo…

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Staircase View Of Toledo And A Happy Virgin

Toledo is stuffed to the rafters with treasures that no ordinary pleb has been allowed to set eyes on in hundreds of years. Recently, the tumble-down Colegio de Infantes (a boy’s school) was renovated and reopened as a museum of ancient tapestries and textiles that had been rotting away in one of the Cathedral’s cellars.

I shall spare you the tapestries and ecclesiastical garments, but have a look at this:

Toledo View 1Looks like a painting at first glance, doesn’t it? But it’s just a view of the city through the panoramic window of one of the building’s staircases:

Toledo Staircase View 2

Religious art isn’t really my thing, but…

Happy Virgin

…have you ever seen those two look quite so heartwarmingly content??

Colegio de Infantes Entrance

The building’s entrance

For the most stunning view of Toledo through a window, click here.

 

Cruising Down The Thames To Greenwich

This is my last batch of London pictures from last week’s trip. You can pat yourselves on the back, you’ve held up most valiantly. Thanks for indulging me in my nostalgic reveries…

I wont torture you with tedious explanations – I’m sure each and every one of you has a tourist tat dust catcher of at least one of these landmarks on their mantlepiece.

Tower bridgeSt Paul'sTower bridge & boatLondon Eye

London river viewCanary Wharf ResidentialCanary Wharf

And a few shots from the hill in Greenwich Park:

Greenwich Park 1Greenwich park view 2Greenwich park view 3Bottled Ship, Greenwich

— THE END —

* Phew! *

 

 

Rainy Regensburg. And Skewered Sausages.

Last Wednesday, mum and I took a trip to Regensburg, another very old and splendid Bavarian town. Things didn’t look very promising when we set off. According to the weather forecast, Regensburg would live up to its name: “Regen” means “rain” in German. (Regen is also the name of a river that flows through the town, which is how it got its name).

In the end, the weather wasn’t too bad, although you’ll notice a distinct lack of blue sky in the photos.

The flowers held up pretty well

The flowers held up pretty well

Perfect weather for snails :)

Perfect weather for snails 🙂

...and man eating fish

…and man-eating fish

man eating fish 2

Street and umbrellaTower and brollyChickensRegensburg streetRegensburg Arch

Regensburg Mural

Time for a food break 🙂 Question: What do you do when you can’t decide which kind of sausage to have..?

Answer: You order them ALL!

Answer: You order them ALL! On a skewer, so they can’t get away.

 

"Sauerbraten" - Beef (which has been marinated overnight), potato dumplings and red cabbage.

“Sauerbraten” – Beef (which has been marinated overnight), potato dumplings and red cabbage. It’s a traditional Bavarian dish, and this incarnation was just PERFECT.

 

A pretty café

A pretty café

Bicycle

Love the daisies 🙂

 

Regensburg's Gothic Cathedral is world famous. I didn't like it much from the inside, far too dark and dingy, although the painted glass windows are amazing, admittedly.

Regensburg’s Gothic Cathedral is world famous. You can’t miss the spires poking out from behind the town houses. I didn’t like it much from the inside, far too dark and dingy, although the painted glass windows are amazing, admittedly.

These next few pictures are from the Church of St Emmeram, which looks fairly unassuming from the outside.

St Emmeram Entrance

St Emmeram 1

From the inside, however…!

St Emmeram Ceiling

St Emmeram Organ

St Emmeram Wooden Ceiling

Painted wooden ceiling, which came out very dark, so I lightened it and enhanced the colours slightly.

St Emmeram gate

Acupuncture - already popular in the dark ages...

Acupuncture – already popular in the dark ages…

OK, that’s it.

Wait… something’s missing… what could that be…? Oh oh, I remember – CAKE!

Poppy seed strudel!!! Actually, I had that before we ever got to Regensburg. Due to a 5-minute delay of the connecting train, we saw our train pull out of the station just as we got there. So we consoled ourselves with cake while waiting for the next one :)

Poppy seed strudel!!!
Actually, I scoffed that before we ever got to Regensburg. Due to a 5-minute delay in our train connection, we saw our train pull out of the station just as we arrived. So we consoled ourselves with coffee & cake while waiting for the next one 🙂

Look Up, Look Down: Trausnitz Castle, Landshut

Yesterday, I posted a bunch of pictures of the beautiful Bavarian city of Landshut (click here if you’ve missed them), so most of you will already be well prepared for what’s coming today: We’re schlepping up the hill to gawp at (and down from) the castle, Burg Trausnitz.

This thing was built in 1204. The Wittelsbach dynasty, which ruled Bavaria for hundreds of years, had its main seat in Landshut for a while, so Castle Trausnitz was ramshackle full of medieval splendour, art and culture. “Was” is the operative word here, because, unfortunately, there was a fire in 1961, which destroyed most of the building and its contents. Cause: faulty electrical wiring. Oh, the (sad) irony…

Anyway, the (rebuilt) place is still pretty impressive, and makes a worthy entry for travelwithintent’s weekly Look Up, Look Down photo challenge 🙂

Burg Trausnitz ArchBurg Trausnitz Way UPBurg Trausnitz White PartBurg Trausnitz TurmBurg Trausnitz InnenhofBurg Trausnitz Innenhof

We took a guided tour, and, although, the rooms were relatively bare (except for the chapel), there were some pretty pieces to view. We weren't allowed to take photos, but I manage this sneaky shot of the "Narrentreppe" (staircase of fools).

We took a guided tour. Although the rooms were relatively bare (except for the chapel), there were some pretty pieces on show. We weren’t allowed to take photos, but I managed this sneaky shot of the “Narrentreppe” (staircase of fools).

The Martinskirche through a window.

The Martinskirche through a Trausnitz Castle window.

Martin's church steeple is Bavaria's highest church steeple.

The Martinskirche steeple is Bavaria’s highest church steeple.

Pretty Bavaria: Landshut

On Tuesday, mum and I made another foray into Lower Bavaria. This time our destination was the splendid city of Landshut,  50 minutes east of Munich by train.

Landshut was founded in 1204. It was a seat of government, before Bavaria was eventually united and Munich became the official capital.

Apparently, Landshut is one of Bavaria’s richest cities. And it certainly is very pretty. I’ll let the pics do the talking…

Landshut HousesLandshut Town HallLandshut Haus 1Landshut KirchendeckeOro vivoLandshut Kirchentor

You didn't think that there wasn't a cake break, did you...?!  Mum had the strawberry cake, and I the Mohnschnecke. I guess you'd call it a poppy seed Danish. BTW, I HATE having to call this heavenly family of baked goods "Danish", because they are very much a Central European thing and have nothing whatsoever to do with bloody Denmark!

You were waiting for that cake break, weren’t you…?! 😉
Mum had the strawberry cake, and I the Mohnschnecke. I guess you’d call it a poppy seed Danish. BTW, I RESENT having to call this heavenly family of baked goods “Danish(es)”, because they are very much a Central European thing and have nothing whatsoever to do with bloody Denmark!

Landshut Houses 3

Martinskirche on the left there, sports the highest church steeple in Bavaria, and the highest red brick steeple in the world, at just over 130m tall. Building works commenced in 1385.

The Martinskirche on the left there, sports Bavaria’s highest church steeple, and the highest red brick steeple in the world, at just over 130 metres tall. Building works commenced in 1385. And I Iove the cyclist in the stripey T-shirt balancing his parcel… 😉

Inside the Martinskirche

Inside the Martinskirche

One of the entrance doors (interior view)

One of the entrance doors (interior view)

In an upcoming post, we’ll be visiting the castle 🙂

Toledo’s Treasures: Santa Clara And Some Fab Tuna

The building where I live is right in front of the convent of Santa Clara (founded in 1369), but I can’t actually see it from my own windows. I’m watering friends’ plants this week, so I took a shot of the convent this morning from their balcony.

Santa Clara

On Sunday, I ventured inside the convent walls on a free guided tour. They didn’t show us much, just the church part and a couple of pretty interior patios. We were not allowed to take photos, and no access was granted to the archives, art collections or other much more interesting parts of this vast medieval building complex.

Santa Clara is home to just three resident nuns, the youngest of whom is 82. It’s pretty much the same story in all of Toledo’s convents and monasteries, of which there are dozens. In a decade from now, there is going to be nobody left, and what will happen to these properties and their hidden treasures then…?

Nice Door. Held open by Catalina.

Cool Door. Held open by my friend Catalina.

A totally delicious dinner of tuna and stir fried vegetables I had on Saturday with my friend Sara in a new restaurant/bar just five minutes from my house. I can't wait to have this again :)

Saturday’s totally delicious dinner of tuna and stir fried vegetables in a new restaurant/bar just five minutes from my house. I can’t wait to have this again 🙂