Tag Archives: Spanish customs

What’s With The Sailor Suits…?

There can be no doubt: Communion season is just around the corner. For several weeks, the shops in Spain have been displaying a selection of breathtaking outfits:

Communion outfits

If it’s trashy enough, Toledo has it!

I shall not got on about the dresses… though I could (hell, I wore one of these frightful contraptions myself at the tender age of 9!). What struck me were the sailor suits. Only a few months ago, I was watching a popular Spanish TV series set in the 70’s, and the communion boys were strapped into these garments, ready for their first crunch of the sacred wafer. (Though you’re most definitely not allowed to crunch them!). It would seem that the naval theme has not suffered a decline in popularity since then, at least here in Spain.

Rummaging around in my own childhood memories, I don’t recall seeing these when I was shunted through this most Catholic of rituals. My male peers, as far as I remember, just wore ‘normal’ monkey-sized dark suits.

My initial guess was that Bavaria not having a proud (or any kind of) naval tradition may have played a role in the absence of sailor suits, but then, I suddenly remembered that I was in possession of my granddad’s First Communion picture! Here it is:

HIs enormous shoes were most likely borrowed from a grown-up relative.

My Granddad! And the collar most definitely smacks of seafarer’s style, don’t you think? Gotta love the short trousers 😉 This picture must have been taken around 1940. His family was dirt poor, so these enormous shoes were most likely borrowed from a grown-up relative.

I’d love to hear from my readers… are sailor suits (still) popular as formal wear for boys where you live? I’ve just been googling around a bit, and I discovered that Japanese school uniforms frequently feature this style.

Enough about clothes, let’s finish off with some food:

I've posted these bread flowers before, so feel free to ignore them, but look at the advertisement behind: Communion cake! I never one of those, and I'd be sure to remember, believe me... I'd have traded that in for a stupid white dress any day!

I know I’ve posted these magnificent bread flowers once before, but look instead at the advertisement behind: Communion cake! I never got one of those, and I’d be sure to remember, believe me…! I’d have traded my insipid white dress for a succulent cake in a flash!

On the other hand… that cake does look a bit dull and prissy for my taste… (and, at the same time, strangely phallic). (Sour grapes, me…? Nevah!)

In any case, I’ve no real reason for retrospective cake envy, as my birthday cakes  were quite something… here’s the evidence, in case you missed that mouthwatering post with all the bad hair:

70’s/80’s Flashbacks: My Love Affair With Cakes

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Dreamy Steamy Cocido

After an entire week of stuffing myself with glorious Portuguese food, my first outing less than 16 hours after arriving back home involved… food. And lots of it. ‘Team Tapas’ was on its annual mission to indulge in the best cocido to be had anywhere in the province, served by  a restaurant called Finca Los Valdespinos in the village of Carmarenilla, 25 mins drive from Toledo.

Cocido is a typical dish of central Spain (of Madrid, in particular, and often referred to as “cocido madrileño”), and a very simple affair. It’s a stew made with chickpeas (garbanzo beans to readers from the US), noodles, vegetables, potatoes and different kinds of meats.

Unlike the stews you may be familiar with, cocido is not just slopped into a soup dish and put in front of you, but served up separately, in three courses. First comes the broth with noodles:

Carmen shows off her expert ladling technique.
That’s Ana in the back there, drafted in by Team Tapas as reinforcement.

Next in line are the chickpeas, veg and potatoes:

There's also a tomato-cumin sauce to go with the chickpeas, plus some cabbage, onions and pickled green chillies

Olga looking all dreamy….
There’s also a tomato-cumin sauce to go with the chickpeas, plus some cabbage, onions and pickled green chillies to be tossed in, according to taste.

Last up is the meat component:

From left to right: Beef, chicken, pork belly, chorizo, morcilla (blood sausage).

From left to right: Beef, chicken, tocino (pork belly), chorizo, morcilla (blood sausage).

The restaurant was heaving, and they have several dining rooms.

Restaurant

I do quite like the light fittings 🙂

The decor of the place is … eccentric, to say the least. The rafter-riding witch you can see up there is not alone. She has an army of sisters, accompanied by straw chickens and all manner of rural paraphernalia cluttering up every available corner. It’s quite overwhelming. By contrast, what comes out of the kitchen is not just in excellent taste, but nothing short of divine!

Annual Tapas Competition – Round II

Those of you who read last Sunday’s post will know all about Toledo’s annual tapas competition “La Jornada De La Tapa“, and how I’m sacrificing myself to participate 😉

I just got back from stuffing myself with these delicacies:

Roast (I think it was pork) with tzatziki in a mini bun

Roast Pork with tzatziki in a mini bun

I already sampled the above tapa last week, but forgot to take a picture out of sheer greediness. I made up for it today, phew! Unfortunately, the meat in my bun was very fatty and I didn’t enjoy it quite as much as last week. A cracking tapa, though, the flavours really work!

Roast courgette filled with venison and topped with manchego cheese. Divine! ...but sadly a tad out of focus ;-)

Roast courgette filled with venison and topped with manchego cheese. Divine! …but sadly totally out of focus 😉

There was a third tapa, but it was a total disappointment on all fronts, visually as well as organoleptically. To console ourselves, we stopped by the ham shop:

My partners in crime: Begoña (beige coat) and Alfonso, tucking into his ham baguette

My partners in crime: Begoña (beige coat) and Alfonso, tucking into his ham baguette

A world of chorizo....

A world of chorizo….

If you want to take a look at last week’s tapas delights, click here.

Annual Tapas Competition – Round I

Every year in November, Toledo mounts a tapas competition, “La Jornada De La Tapa”. Bars and restaurants create their own special tapa, and our job is to trawl from place to place until we cannot squeeze in another morsel for fear of bursting out of our seams.

Of course, a glass of wine or beer is mandatory with every sampling, I leave it up to you to imagine the state of the judging panel by the end of a 3-hour assessment round. But someone’s got to do it.

The tapas are priced at €2 this year, and there are 82 participating bars and restaurants in Toledo.

This is serious stuff, you understand - this is the voting slip.

This tapas contest is serious stuff, you understand – here are the leaflet and the voting slip.

My co-judges Olga and Carmen

My (already a bit tipsy) co-judges Olga and Carmen

Olga can't wait to tuck in to hers ;-) Steak cooked in soy sauce, with foie gras and and fig salsa.

Oh, the anticipation 😉
Steak cooked in soy sauce, with foie gras and and fig salsa.

Fried Iberian pancetta, chickpea stew with vinaigrette.  Sounds like a weird combo, but it was delish!

Fried Iberian pancetta, chickpea stew with vinaigrette. Sounds like a weird combo, but it was delish!

I didn’t take pics of all the tapas we snarfed, but the one below was the definite winner for me:

Iberian pork glazed with hummus and onions

Glazed Iberian pork with hummus and onions. The meat was melt-in-the-mouth tender and the flavour out of this world.

We finished off with cake, of course:

La Malquerida has probably the best carrot cake I've eaten anywhere. And I've eaten a lot of carrot cake in my life...

‘La Malquerida’ has probably the best carrot cake I’ve ever eaten anywhere. And I’ve eaten a lot of carrot cake in my life 😉 This one’s very moist and not too sweet, and I even love the frosting, which I usually just scrape off.

We’re planning on another tapas judging expedition next Sunday. I hope to be a bit more consistent when it comes to taking photos of those lovely creations before gobbling them up.

Friday Frolics: Toledo’s Musicians

Last Friday night, my friend and I spotted this group of Galician Gaiteiros (bagpipe players from Galicia, an autonomous region in the North West of Spain) roaming the streets. I’m not sure what the difference is between a “gaita” and a Scottish bagpipe. They sound just the same to my untrained ear – like cats in heat being trodden on by spiky heels.

GaiteirosNext up, a guitar player setting up in one of Toledo’s main shopping streets. He’s struggling to find himself a suitable spot amidst the perpetual digging-up-of-pipes.

What a fetching outfit! love the socks...

What a fetching outfit! Love the purple socks…

This one's a regular, he plays his cello outside Toledo Cathedral every weekend.

This one’s a regular, he plays his cello outside Toledo Cathedral every weekend.

I’ve featured the lovely Ana Alcaide and her nyckelharpa once before in this post, but here she is again, seeing that she is a local and a regular, as well as the most famous.

Ana Alcaide

La Noche Toledana: Burning Men, Cathedral Innards And A Medieval Tiff!

Saturday a week ago, I was out and about with some friends, enjoying La Noche Toledana. Click here for the previous post explaining what it’s about, in case you’ve missed it.

Armed with a bottle of beer (what a classy lot we are) and ice cream, we witnessed ‘the burning of the man’:

Burning manIf you’re wondering what this annual ritual is all about, I haven’t got the faintest.

They put up projectors in the streets so we knew where we were at all times

They put up projectors in the streets, so we knew where we were at all times. Quite handy, as I couldn’t find my way out of a paper bag…

The court building all eerily lit up

The court building all eerily lit up

Toledo Cathedral by night

Toledo Cathedral by night

La Noche Toledana gave us the opportunity to get into Toledo Cathedral for free. They usually charge an outrageous €12, and so I’d only ever been inside once. There was an organ concert, which normally wouldn’t be quite my thing, but it made for an amazing atmosphere that night.

The organ

The organ

Toledo Cathedral interior

Shoddy workmanship, that. There’s still a few bits NOT covered with gold paint!

El Greco's Apostles. The painter once lived in Toledo

El Greco’s Apostles. The renaissance painter, born in Crete, lived in Toledo and died here in 1614. He is said to have used patients in a local mental hospital as models for the faces of his famous paintings of the twelve Apostles.

Toledo Cathedral Art

Not only the Son of God, but also the most celebrated pole dancer of his time. I always suspected that his alleged carpentry gig was just a cover to feign respectability

I took these earlier on, outside the town hall; it was still light when we set out on our round:

"Red socks and sandals. Bloody ridiculous!"

“Red socks and sandals. Bloody ridiculous!”

"I did try telling him this morning!"

“I did try telling him this morning!”

"Just keep scrambling those eggs, that's something you know about" "Just can't take a joke, can you?!"

“Just keep scrambling those eggs, woman, at least that’s something you know about”
“Keep your hair on! Not that you’ve got a whole lot left under that silly hat. Ooooops… another one of your bal… sore spots, is it?!”